#ProLifeGeneration

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I couldn’t be more proud to be Pro-Life as I watched such a diverse, loving, and inspirational group of hundreds of thousands March for Life today. From the streets to the stage, words of conviction sounded loud and clear: “Life is winning again!” “Keep fighting for Life!” “We are the Pro-Life generation!”

It is so encouraging and inspiring to see crowds of children, high-schoolers, and college students passionately standing up for unborn babies–the victims who have no voice. These youth are the next generation of the Pro-Life movement, and they give me great hope for the future. I believe that they will courageously link arms with the generations before them who have built the foundation of the movement to end legalized abortion in this country and the world.

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Young people, you may not see the fruit of your efforts on this side of eternity…but then again, you might. I don’t know that there has ever been this kind of momentum for life in our country since Roe v. Wade. We have reason to hope, and we have a generation passionate about bringing a culture of life to America.

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I didn’t go to the march this year because my oldest is only five, and he is an inquisitive 5-year-old. I don’t think there would be a way to take him without having to explain to him what abortion was, and I’m certainly not going to shatter this kid’s world by revealing such a horrific thing. How wonderful would it be, if by the time it was appropriate to have that conversation, legal abortion was a thing of the past? With that hope, we keep fighting for life.

#ThePowerofOne

As part of this Pro-Life generation (whether you are 5, 15 or 50), you do indeed have great power. Your power for the Pro-Life movement lies in your small and daily sacrifices, acts of love, and prayers.  Never doubt the eternal reaches of those kindnesses and petitions to heaven, for in the words of Julia Carney:

Little drops of water,
little grains of sand,
make the mighty ocean
and the beauteous land.

And the little moments,
humble though they may be,
make the mighty ages
of eternity.

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Photo credit: Eileen Snyder of Bowie, MD

 

Thankful…for Hope

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Yesterday was one of those days. I was struggling with parenting bad behaving toddlers, dealing with some stressful and emotionally challenging issues, and then to top it all off, my 16-month-old pulls a hot cup of tea off the counter and onto his chest. I raced to pull his clothes off, soak his burned skin in cold water, and call the pediatrician. Continue reading “Thankful…for Hope”

Thankful…For Confession

Perhaps it is the time of year, but I keep bumping into the realization that gratitude is a powerful avenue for grace and goodness in our lives. Which means that I have also become acutely aware of my heart’s lack of it. I have come to see that my perspective on most things is directly correlated to my gratitude in that area. For example, when my thoughts regarding someone I love seem to be overly critical, I realize that it is tied to a disproportionate focus on the qualities this person lacks or mistakes he or she has made. Once I start to consider the many wonderful qualities of that person or ways that person blesses me, my critique softens and my perspective widens.

Living without enough gratitude essentially means that we are constantly focused on what we, or others, lack. It breeds discontentment and sets us up for strive. As with the formation of all spiritual disciplines, I need to make deeper gratitude a habit in order to become a more thankful person. I have heard of people keeping gratitude journals, and I thought I would try it. It’s nothing elaborate, but I simply daily write a couple of lines about someone or something I am thankful to God (the source of all good) for in my life. In keeping with this mindset, I thought I would spend the month of November blogging about some big things we have to be thankful for in our lives.

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Continue reading “Thankful…For Confession”

The Enemy of the Good

fir0002 | flagstaffotos.com.au [GFDL 1.2 (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html)], via Wikimedia Commons
fir0002 | flagstaffotos.com.au [GFDL 1.2 (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons
We just started homeschooling this year, as our oldest has started Kindergarten. So I have spent the summer reading various books on education philosophies. A great book that I just finished reading is Susan Schaeffer Macaulay’s For the Children’s Sake, which is basically a summary and modern-day application of Charlotte Mason’s philosophy of education and teaching principles. Mason believed that a child’s mind should be respected and filled with only the best source material; and she advocated, among other things, reading aloud “living books” filled with “story” and letting children discover and connect first-hand with nature. Macaulay makes a most compelling case for Mason’s ideals in education — at home or in a school. But at various points, Macaulay notes the skeptic’s response, and that some may find such an approach to education too idealistic or impractical in our current society. She doesn’t think it is unattainable for the average person to give children this kind of education, but she concedes that we are imperfect people in imperfect circumstances. Toward the end of the book, she gives beautifully true advice: “If you can’t give them everything, give them something.” Continue reading “The Enemy of the Good”